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Fighting Chance
     Peter Bauza/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
Women Boxers of Uganda - Launched July 29, 2014 - Full multimedia experience: audio, stills, text and or video: Go to zReportage.com to see more - In addition to the natural beauty of wildlife and waters such as the Nile, Uganda also known as the Pearl of Africa, is hiding neglected sport talents living under the poorest conditions. Katanga in Kampala is a slum community where more than 20,000 people live extreme poverty. Women living in the city's poorest slums train for perhaps the world's most brutal sport. Boxing is considered a game for men in Uganda, and women fighters are looked down upon and despised. Most of the women who box in the city are single mothers. And even though their matches are seldom promoted, a pro-fight, which can net between $25 and $50 Dollars, is lucrative for these women, who have jobs and work as seamstresses, hairdressers and even nightclub bouncers for around $3 a day. This sport does not count on nor receive financial support from the government, or from the public and fans as compared to soccer. The women of the Rhino Boxing Club box for a better life, full of dreams and expectations, trying to feed themselves and their families, trying to achieve local and international recognition and appreciation.
Fighting Chance
     Peter Bauza/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
Women Boxers of Uganda - Launched July 29, 2014 - Full multimedia experience: audio, stills, text and or video: Go to zReportage.com to see more - In addition to the natural beauty of wildlife and waters such as the Nile, Uganda also known as the Pearl of Africa, is hiding neglected sport talents living under the poorest conditions. Katanga in Kampala is a slum community where more than 20,000 people live extreme poverty. Women living in the city's poorest slums train for perhaps the world's most brutal sport. Boxing is considered a game for men in Uganda, and women fighters are looked down upon and despised. Most of the women who box in the city are single mothers. And even though their matches are seldom promoted, a pro-fight, which can net between $25 and $50 Dollars, is lucrative for these women, who have jobs and work as seamstresses, hairdressers and even nightclub bouncers for around $3 a day. This sport does not count on nor receive financial support from the government, or from the public and fans as compared to soccer. The women of the Rhino Boxing Club box for a better life, full of dreams and expectations, trying to feed themselves and their families, trying to achieve local and international recognition and appreciation.