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Rallying Cry
     Richard Tsong-Taatarii/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
Pipeline projects have become part of an intense public debate over the energy future of the US. The Dakota Access Pipeline would carry 500,000 barrels of crude per day from North Dakota to Illinois along a route that passes near the Standing Rock reservation, which has a 41 percent poverty rate. Federal agencies have raised environmental justice concerns because of that. An estimated 7.4 billion barrels of undiscovered oil is believed to be in the US portion of the Bakken Formation, according to the US Geological Survey. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has sued the federal government, saying the Native American tribe was not properly consulted over the project to construct a 1,168-mile crude oil pipeline that extends over four states. While proponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline tout its economic boost, opponents question its environmental impact. The US Army Corps of Engineers approved the project, granting final permits in July, to the dismay of environmentalists and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. However last week the U.S. government announced that it was voluntarily halting work on the project.
Rallying Cry
     Richard Tsong-Taatarii/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
Pipeline projects have become part of an intense public debate over the energy future of the US. The Dakota Access Pipeline would carry 500,000 barrels of crude per day from North Dakota to Illinois along a route that passes near the Standing Rock reservation, which has a 41 percent poverty rate. Federal agencies have raised environmental justice concerns because of that. An estimated 7.4 billion barrels of undiscovered oil is believed to be in the US portion of the Bakken Formation, according to the US Geological Survey. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has sued the federal government, saying the Native American tribe was not properly consulted over the project to construct a 1,168-mile crude oil pipeline that extends over four states. While proponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline tout its economic boost, opponents question its environmental impact. The US Army Corps of Engineers approved the project, granting final permits in July, to the dismay of environmentalists and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. However last week the U.S. government announced that it was voluntarily halting work on the project.