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Feeling The Bern
     David Gross/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
'Feel the Bern' began as a simple hashtag on social media and has exploded in popularity, becoming the de facto slogan for the Bernie Sanders now historic run for President. The insurgent presidential campaign upended conventional wisdom about money in politics. Most presidential candidates consider super PACs, capable of accepting unlimited amounts of corporate money, a central part of their strategy to win the White House. Sanders took a different path. The Vermont senator is the first high-profile Democratic presidential candidate to loudly insist he doesn't have or want a super PAC in the aftermath of Citizens United, the 2010 Supreme Court ruling that opened the door to a flood of money into politics. Instead, Sanders has relied on average Americans to donate whatever they can, a strategy that has proved remarkably successful. Sanders vowed to work with rival Hillary Clinton to defeat Donald Trump, but he refused to withdraw from the Democratic presidential race and did not endorse her. Sanders has a long list of agenda goals including overhauling a primary process that would make it easier for people to vote, an end to super-delegates and a liberal platform that urges help for middle- and lower-income people. The 74-year-old self-described democratic socialist surprised most people, including himself, by tapping into anger brewing in the country to galvanize a new crop of voters as a champion of the underpaid, overworked American worker. In a year when Clinton was expected to walk away easily with the nomination, Sanders won 12 million votes and contests in 22 states. Bernie has the power to persuade his legion of followers to unite behind a single Democratic candidate, no matter if it's Clinton or, by some miracle of delegate mathematics, himself.
Feeling The Bern
     David Gross/zReportage.com via ZUMA (bios)
'Feel the Bern' began as a simple hashtag on social media and has exploded in popularity, becoming the de facto slogan for the Bernie Sanders now historic run for President. The insurgent presidential campaign upended conventional wisdom about money in politics. Most presidential candidates consider super PACs, capable of accepting unlimited amounts of corporate money, a central part of their strategy to win the White House. Sanders took a different path. The Vermont senator is the first high-profile Democratic presidential candidate to loudly insist he doesn't have or want a super PAC in the aftermath of Citizens United, the 2010 Supreme Court ruling that opened the door to a flood of money into politics. Instead, Sanders has relied on average Americans to donate whatever they can, a strategy that has proved remarkably successful. Sanders vowed to work with rival Hillary Clinton to defeat Donald Trump, but he refused to withdraw from the Democratic presidential race and did not endorse her. Sanders has a long list of agenda goals including overhauling a primary process that would make it easier for people to vote, an end to super-delegates and a liberal platform that urges help for middle- and lower-income people. The 74-year-old self-described democratic socialist surprised most people, including himself, by tapping into anger brewing in the country to galvanize a new crop of voters as a champion of the underpaid, overworked American worker. In a year when Clinton was expected to walk away easily with the nomination, Sanders won 12 million votes and contests in 22 states. Bernie has the power to persuade his legion of followers to unite behind a single Democratic candidate, no matter if it's Clinton or, by some miracle of delegate mathematics, himself.